Reading Tributes to Ken Wapnick

The Foundation for A Course in Miracles has published a collection of tributes to Ken Wapnick. I read it this morning over tea. You might like it, too.

As I’ve said before, Ken was deeply influential in my (still-evolving to be sure) understanding of A Course in Miracles. I admired his intellectual rigor even as I spent a lot of my reading time arguing with it. I was never not touched by his devotion to the course.

The tributes are moving and helpful, in their way. Because I did not know Ken personally, it is interesting to read so many people touting his sense of humor and amiability. He told me in our one exchange that Emily Dickinson was a wonderful poet, all the evidence I needed to know he was in close contact with Jesus, but still. It is nice to share physical space with someone.

Having read a lot of Ken’s work, it was always my sense that he evolved as a teacher and student of the course, moving from an intellectual understanding towards a broader, more comprehensive application (without ever compromising his intellectual gift. A number of the tributes suggested this was the case. When are we going to stop indulging resistance? When we will accept the happy truth of our One True Self?

Why not now? We have nothing to lose but our anguish.

I think it is helpful to study the course. I don’t think an intellectual or academic grasp of its ideas is bad. On the contrary, I think it can be very helpful. But I do think that if we can’t bring it into application in our lives – here and now – then we’ve missed the point. We want to live in peace, not just babble – however eloquently, however knowledgeably – about it.

This was the premise of Tara Singh’s teaching as well.

We are here to bring A Course in Miracles into application, and that means that we are no longer into learning. The world wants to learn about things but we are concerned with bringing the Course into application – right here, right now. The learning phase is over (Dialogues on A Course in Miracles 60).

And it can be so simple! Ken’s students testify to this, over and over, in their own words. Happiness – deep happiness, natural happiness, real happiness – is not only an ideal. Ken taught them – and through his writing and recorded material still teaches – that happiness is a present reality, a condition available to all of us now.

It is touching to read so many voices living the course, bringing to bear in these lives we temporarily call our home. It reminds me that regardless of what form our worldly teacher takes, we are all in this together, hand in hand, stumbling back to the grace we never left. Good to know . . .

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