With Respect to Photographs

Earlier this year I began to add photographs to my posts. I can be long-winded and sometimes a little illustration of one kind or another helps to break up the long chunks of text.

Initially I used paintings of famous – or relatively famous – works of art that are in the public domain and seemed related in some way to the content I was writing. But more and more I have been using pictures that we take in our family. There is a reason for this.

Though I love A Course in Miracles as a curriculum, and feel somewhat competent in talking and sharing about it, I am much more interested in how we bring it into application. How do we live as students of the course? Intellectual understanding is helpful – I think it is a big piece of ACIM, actually – but it is not, of itself, sufficient to awaken us. In fact, it can very easily become an impediment.

That is why I am so devoted to Tara Singh as my teacher – why I glommed onto him so quickly and attentively, and why I continue to so closely read his work. He was not interested in explicating A Course in Miracles but in facilitating its application, in making it the lived reality of those who were ready to be its students. The difference may seem subtle but it is significant indeed.

I am trying to share – within the boundaries of what is acceptable to my wife and children, and my own sometimes confused sense of propriety – what life looks like when one struggles in a sincere and wordy way (which I do) to live and practice A Course in Miracles. My sense is that there is a need for this sort of approach and – more to the point – I am not much good at writing about it any other way.

Thus, more and more, I am going to be posting photographs that reflect our family life – gardening, walking, raising chickens and children, playing in the forest, making food and clothing and so on and so forth. The pictures may not be necessarily germane to the post itself but I hope they will witness in a general way to the happiness, beauty, community and productivity that informs my life as a student of A Course in Miracles. I hope they are helpful.

The pictures are taken mostly by Chrisoula, my wife, or by Sophia and Fionnghuala, my daughters. I don’t dislike cameras – in fact, I love visual art very much – but it tends to distract me from the wordiness that is my own humble and humbling art.

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